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ROKER ROUNDUP: Cabral speaks honestly about Sunderland departure & ex-striker gets jail sentence

Cabral has given an honest interview about his Sunderland departure, whilst elsewhere one of our former strikers has been handed a jail sentence in Denmark.

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Cabral discusses Sunderland career

Former Sunderland midfielder Cabral is currently plying his trade in the Swiss second division for Lausanne-Sport. The Cape Verde international has had a difficult few years but has been an integral figure as the club have risen to joint-top of the table.

Speaking to 24Heures.ch about his experiences with Lausanne-Sport so far, the midfielder touched on his experiences at Sunderland - and Serie A side Genoa - and was asked why it didn’t work out for him.

The 30-year-old blamed his own impatience, as well as Paolo Di Canio’s departure for his failure at Sunderland, noting that Gus Poyet wasn’t interested in using him:

Because I was too impatient. While I thought I deserved the respect of my teammates coming from Basel and having played for several years the Champions League - and eliminated Manchester United - I had to find that it did not represent anything to them. I was starting from scratch again.

This did not prevent me from achieving excellent preparation and play a very good first match of the Premier League. Before suffering a stress fracture. And when I came back, the coach who had wanted me was no longer there and for his successor, I did not exist.

Hence my desire to leave for Genoa, where only the difficult financial situation of the club has made this experience lasted only five months.

He went on to say that he should have left Basel sooner than he did but frankly admits that he did not have the courage to leave his comfort zone.

I should have left Basel sooner. The last three years, I had very interesting offers that I refused. Because I was in a high standard of comfort, I did not have the courage to go put myself in danger abroad. I lacked ambition. But my biggest regret is the Swiss team. I was in the right car, but I went down too soon.

During his time at Sunderland, Cabral was embroiled in a court case after he was accused of raping a woman he had met in a nightclub, in which he was found not guilty.

The midfielder discussed how difficult that experience was for him:

This case strengthened me morally because I knew that I was innocent. On the other hand, it really hurt me when I realized that the eyes of others were changing. Not to mention, of course, the great suffering of my loved ones and my family.

Sunderland v Fulham - Premier League Photo by Matthew Lewis/Getty Images

Bendtner given jail sentence

Ex-Sunderland striker Nicklas Bendtner has been handed a 50-day jail sentence for assaulting a taxi driver in his native Denmark.

Bendtner has been released pending appeal but the striker, who currently plays for Norwegian outfit Rosenborg, won’t lost his job over the sentence with the club’s chief executive Tove Moe Dyrhaug saying they plan to retain his services:

We think that it’s not good for the club and not good for Nicklas, but he remains a player of the club. We are keeping him.

The Danish international admitted hitting the driver but explained that he felt threatened after him and his girlfriend left without paying.

Sunderland v Swansea City - Premier League Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images

Sunderland’s wage bills over the years

The Financial Times have gone through the data on Companies House and collated every Premier League club’s wage bills dating back to 1992.

You can see how Sunderland’s wage bills over that period spiralled out of control below but a few interesting things to take away.

When we were promoted to the Premier League under Peter Reid during the Roker Park days or wage bill that season only went up by £1m but after we departed the old ground for the Stadium of Light, the wage bill rose by £2.3m, showing how Reid was backed by the club.

Reidy was then backed again the following season to the tune of another £1.5m increase despite failure in the Play-Off Final, as he steered us to 105 points as we finished as champions. The wage bill then doubled for our first season back in the Premier League and it steadily rose for each successive season until the 19 point season when it had reached £30m.

The next season saw the wage bill halved as we dropped into the Championship and then stayed around £15m for the next couple of season, which goes a long way to explain the 15 point season.

Drumaville and then Ellis Short took over and a return to the Premier League saw our wage bill increase to a staggering £83m in 2015-16, with an increase in every single season from that point apart from the 2012-13 season - a season which saw high earners like Craig Gordon, Asamoah Gyan, Cristian Riveros, George McCartney, Michael Turner, Marcos Angeleri, Kieran Richardson all leave.

  • 1992-93 - £2,234,230 - Championship
  • 1993-94 - £2,968,365 - Championship
  • 1994-95 - £2,991,000 - Championship
  • 1995-96 - £4,112,000 - Championship
  • 1996-97 - £5,176,000 - Premier League
  • 1997-98 - £7,466,000 - Championship
  • 1998-99 - £8,949,000 - Championship
  • 1999-00 - £16,821,429 - Premier League
  • 2000-01 - £20,759,000 - Premier League
  • 2001-02 - £23,002,000 - Premier League
  • 2002-03 - £30,521,000 - Premier League
  • 2003-04 - £15,048,000 - Championship
  • 2004-05 - £14,530,000 - Championship
  • 2005-06 - £15,552,000 - Premier League
  • 2006-07 - £23,601,000 - Championship
  • 2007-08 - £36,865,000 - Premier League
  • 2008-09 - £49,525,000 - Premier League
  • 2009-10 - £53,687,000 - Premier League
  • 2010-11 - £60,882,000 - Premier League
  • 2011-12 - £63,784,000 - Premier League
  • 2012-13 - £56,776,000 - Premier League
  • 2013-14 - £68,055,000 - Premier League
  • 2014-15 - £75,158,000 - Premier League
  • 2015-16 - £83,808,000 - Premier League

You can read the entire Financial Times database on Premier League wage bills on github.com HERE.

Sunderland v Burnley - Premier League Photo by Nigel Roddis/Getty Images