clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Roker Roundup: Charlie Methven gives details of financial ‘skeletons’ in Sunderland’s cupboard

In an exclusive interview with Roker Report, Executive Director Charlie Methven has detailed the issues that the new owners still have to tackle in order to stabilise Sunderland long term.

Your daily reminder of Sunderland news!

Methven on skeletons in Sunderland’s cupboard

Charlie Methven was kind enough to take time out of his busy schedule to chat with Roker Report’s own Ken Spours about the financial situation at Sunderland.

You can read the full, extensive interview later today on RokerReport.com - but in a little taster of what he had to say, Methven discusses the financial skeleton’s that remain in Sunderland’s closet:

While Ellis paid off the debt and we are getting costs under control, the club still faces a number of outstanding legal cases and minor commercial disputes.

One in particular did not go the way we had expected, and the £4.5 million judgement in the Ricky Alvarez case came as a hammer blow because we had been told by the club’s previous management that it was a shoo-in for us.

There are still other outstanding cases against the club, and when you add all these things up there’s probably been a maximum total of about £12 million worth of potential skeletons. We also found out that the first quarter of 2018/2019’s season tickets, collected in April 2018 but surely supposed to cover costs in June and July, had already been spent before we got the keys to the house. That made for a very tricky summer, with no revenue at all coming in!

On the other hand, a few good unexpected things have happened. There are some clauses in historic transfers out that have come good and FIFA payments during the World Cups made the club an extra £500,000 we hadn’t budgeted for.

But the overall situation is that the 2018/2019 parachute payments had already been promised away on another historic mess - buying players on tick had led to a £22 million overhang on players, many of whom were no longer at the club - on paying down the last bit of debt until it was cleared, as had already been planned, and on the court cases. It’s all kinda what parachute payments are supposed to do – help a former Premier League club sort itself out – but the previous management had been kicking cans down the road to prevent the need for a major restructure… whereas by the time we got here everything simply had to be paid… and if we hadn’t done the big restructure then an administrator surely would have had to do so not long after.

You can read the rest of the in-depth interview with Charlie Methven - where he talks in-depth about Sunderland’s past, present and future finances - exclusively on RokerReport.com from 10am today.


Busy times for Sartori

Juan Sartori has been busy in Uruguay the last week or so, as the Sunderland board member has held over 100 meetings with politicians from various parties throughout the country ahead of his expected run to be the National Party’s candidate for the president of Uruguay.

Despite his hectic schedule, there are still over 180 requests for Sartori to attend meetings as he travels around the country talking to the city and council leaders in the country’s states, several of whom have already pledged to back him if or when he announces his candidacy.

Sartori left Uruguay over the weekend to head to New York but, according to El Pais, he is expected to announce a decision on whether he will run or not before Christmas.


Family success for Oviedo

Bryan Oviedo’s niece Monserrath Campos Oviedo could be set to follow in her uncle’s footsteps with the 16-year-old making waves shortly after arriving in the USA.

The youngster’s family moved to America three months ago for work reasons and has not only already been snapped up by a Collegiate team but has also been drawing admiring glances from University teams.

Although she plays at right-back, rather than at left-back like her uncle, Monserrath says the Sunderland player has been a huge inspiration to her:

Football is born with my uncle, I’ve seen the whole process he has done to get where he is. I love his game, I love watching him play, when he plays I try to pay close attention to see his movements. One of the things that inspires me most about him is how he got up from bad times, one sees him and always tries 100 percent.

My uncle supports me 100%, in fact when this opportunity came up I told him what I had in mind and he told me to do it and to fight, he also told me he was very proud of me.