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GRAYSON SACKED: What a mess; Just where do Sunderland go from here?

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Simon Grayson has been sacked in the wake of Sunderland’s draw with basement side Bolton Wanderers.

Bury v Sunderland - Carabao Cup First Round Photo by Nathan Stirk/Getty Images

Just eleven minutes after the final whistle of the 3-3 draw at home to rock-bottom Bolton Wanderers, the club officially - and ruthlessly - announced the sacking of manager Simon Grayson.

Martin Bain in the club statement claimed:

Simon and his team have worked tirelessly to achieve the best for the football club during their time here.

While we hoped that Simon’s experience in the Football League would help us to a successful season, results have not been good enough for a club of this stature.

In order for us to improve upon our current position we believe a fundamental change is necessary.

The statement also announced Assistant Manager Glynn Snodin departs alongside Grayson.

This is a damning indictment of the current state in which our club finds itself in due to the stewardship of Short and Bain, however, this is irrevocably the right decision.

It has been clear for some time now that Grayson had lost the dressing room. Granted, he had very little to work with due to his meagre transfer budget, but this is in fact one of the largest he has recieved in his managerial career.

Regardless of what anyone mat say, equalling the record of time without a win at home in England is simply not good enough at any level. This current playing squad with a competent manager will be more than good enough for a comfortable mid-table position at least.

Tactically he has no clue, in neither attack nor defence. The players do not defend as a solid unit, but as a scattered mess. All too often runs from deep have not been followed by our midfielders - like Karl Henry's goal today. Aiden McGeady and Callum McManaman left their respective full back isolated all too often against Bolton. This has been a season-long trend, as shown by how many times the quietly impressive Bryan Oviedo was left to fend alone against Bolton's biggest threat, Sammy Ameobi. Just how much defensive work does Grayson actually do with the players in training?

In attack, the only times Sunderland players score are from genuine individual quality or when we play a rare bit of attacking football. For 90% of games under Grayson it'd simply be long-ball football centred around physicality and pace in a team almost completely devoid of physicality and pace. The players he signed do not fit his system, if he can even call it that.

The next appointment now must address our defensive fragility beyond anything else, and bring some passion back to a position haunted by a pair of uncharismatic, clueless managers. One member of the management team - whether that be the actual manager themselves or someone on their coaching staff - must have an intrinsic knowledge of the club, and simply just "get it".

Do this, win games, and the fans will surely return in their droves.