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Fan Letters: I feel sorry for the Sunderland players; Grayson’s lack of acumen is worrying

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This lack of acumen is worrying, and if we can't hold a two goal lead against a lower table side like Brentford, what hope do we have under the current manager?” writes RR reader Mitch Marshall.

SAFC.com

Dear Roker Report,

I feel sorry for the Sunderland players. Rarely have I found myself writing that, but after yesterday's shambolic second half tactics, I am compelled to.

The lads had worked hard to gain a seldom seen half time lead against an average Brentford side; we were then tactically dominated and ,after some poor substitutions by Grayson, were lucky to come away with a solitary point that keeps us in deep trouble.

Brentford's main ploy was to play very wide: time and again they sprayed the ball to wingers with chalk on their boots who had acres of space, and enough time to boil a kettle.

Brentford v Sunderland - Sky Bet Championship Photo by Jordan Mansfield/Getty Images

Yet Grayson persisted with a back four that played very narrow, and only brave defending from Kone and O'Shea saved us at times.

This had the effect, also, of making our already beleaguered full backs look even more pitiful. Thankfully Brentford lacked a powerhouse striker; otherwise things could have been even more catastrophic.

Perhaps a switch to a 5-4-1 would have allowed the full backs to essentially mark the wingers out of the game, but Grayson - we can now all see - is not a master tactician in any sense.

Brentford v Sunderland - Sky Bet Championship Photo by Jordan Mansfield/Getty Images

Indeed his senses told him to substitute the resurgent Duncan Watmore, the brace scorer Grabban, and talisman McGeady. Meanwhile, he allowed Ndong and Cattermole to see out the game when they were clearly tiring.

This lack of acumen is worrying, and if we can't hold a two goal lead against a lower table side like Brentford, what hope do we have under the current manager? That is for you, and the club's ailing hierarchy, to decide.

Mitch Marshall